Sculpt Your Life

Reduce pain, stress and anxiety the natural way and restore your balance and and vitality.

Sculpt Your Life

Reduce pain, stress and anxiety the natural way and restore your balance and and vitality.

Workshop - Reducing Stress and Anxiety

$75.00 $65.00

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Workshop - Reducing Stress and Anxiety

$75.00 $65.00

More Details

 

While stress is unavoidable creating balance and restoring a sense of balance and calm is a choice. When under duress our body develops muscular tension patterns, that stay long after the the events that triggered the reaction have gone.

This experiential workshop will help you restore an inner calm and balance in your body, using movement, breath (Feldenkrais) and observation.

Three hour work shop. 

Date: Sunday, June 17th, 2018
Time:
class begins at 10:30 - 1:30 PM


Location: 

Reflections Center for Conscious Living & Yoga
227 E 24th St (between 2nd Ave & 3rd Ave)
New York, NY 10010

  While stress is unavoidable creating balance and restoring a sense of balance and calm is a choice. When under duress our body develops muscular tension patterns, that stay long after the the events that triggered the reaction have gone. This experiential workshop will help you restore an inner calm and balance in your body, using movement, breath (Feldenkrais) and observation. Three hour wor...

Workshop - Reducing Stress and Anxiety

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Testimonial

"Hands down, Noam is the most intuitive and talented bodyworker/masseur that I have ever worked with." - S. Coelho.

Testimonial

"Hands down, Noam is the most intuitive and talented bodyworker/masseur that I have ever worked with." - S. Coelho.

Introductory Movement and Mindfulness Lab class

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Workshop - Reducing Stress and Anxiety

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Group Sessions

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How to deal with stress and anxiety?

While stress and anxiety can be overwhelming to solutions are often pretty easy. To learn more read this blog.

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How to deal with stress and anxiety?

While stress and anxiety can be overwhelming to solutions are often pretty easy. To learn more re...

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Why suffer from lower back pain?

Dana, a 45 year old mother and an avid runner, came in for a treatment with severe ongoing lower back pain. A couple of months earlier, she had sprained her ankle. Within a few days, once the discomfort in the ankle subsided, she was back in her routine. Soon afterwards. she began to experience sharp pains in her lower back and a tightness in her hips. To alleviate the discomfort, she cut back on her physical activities, while looking for solutions that could enable her to regain her regular mobility. As is often the case, when we experience as injury, we compensate by using other areas of our body to prevent extensive use of the injured area. After a short period, the compensation stratagy, originally intended to bring relief, becomes a habit, changing ones entire movement pattern. Unaware that her movement patterns had changed, she was now looking for a solution for her back pains. How could she fix it? Clearly she was not a novice and had explored a number of treatments. I asked her to do some basic movements walking, turning, bending. I observed her movement, to see where she may be straining and what maybe limiting her movements. “What can you do about it?” she inquired. What differentiates functional integration from other modalities is the focus on the nervous system and integration, rather than the musculature and the bones (structure). In my work I use touch, and gentle guided movement, as a means to self organization. Over the next few treatments Dana was able to reorganize her movements, reducing the discomfort she experienced in the first place, she is able to regain almost full functioning capacity and get back to the activities she values. For consultation about back pain relief, email: Info@noamgamady.com   

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Why suffer from lower back pain?

Dana, a 45 year old mother and an avid runner, came in for a treatment with severe ongoing lower...

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Tension, Ease and Balance

 This was one of those mornings. My body refused to cooperate. Every move felt strenuous. My lower back had collapsed. My whole body seemed to be throbbing with pain. In the past, I would have taken a couple of Advil's and waited impatiently for the pain to subside.

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Tension, Ease and Balance

 This was one of those mornings. My body refused to cooperate. Every move felt strenuous. My low...

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Listening to Your Body - Observation

Observational toolsIn the quest for balance and flow, it is easily for one to overlook the state of where they are at in the present moment.Imagine taking a selfie, and observing what are you experiencing?Today’s tool, is OBSERVATION. Sense where you are physically, emotionally and mentally without trying change anything. Instead allow the shifts to happen naturally.An analogy I like to use, is the theatre. Imagine going to a play. The lights dim, the auditorium quiets down, and a spotlight goes on. The center of attention is focused on a single section of the stage. At this moment the scene looks perfect, nothing else exists. Yet, in the background there are many other activities going on which our attention unaware of: lighting technicians, stage and production managers, gofers, box office attendants etcetera... all interacting to create the experience.Our observational tools are not activated.​Observational tools support us in exploring those areas which are often unseen, yet greatly impact our experience. While we may excel in certain areas of our lives: work, investment, sports and other fields of interest, it is our blind spots set the underlying tone and quality of our experiences. On the physical level we experience tension, movement, and relaxation, ease...On the emotional level we maybe experiencing challenges in our relationships, intimacy, self acceptance, self love and trust.Last but not least, on a mental level we may be faced with failure success, financial achievement and purpose issues.How can you experience those areas that are less visible unless you use the spotlight as a tool and what can you gain by using the tool?Take physical discomfort for example. When we experience it, our attention is on the discomfort. We may try to ignore it for a while. If it persists we may use other parts of our body to compensate or we might take a painkiller to numb the ache. We ignore the fact that the discomfort in itself is not the cause, but it is the effect of being out of balance. Any attempt to ignore or suppress it, will at best, buy us some time, but will not fix the problem! The observation tool works best if used when we first notice the discomfort.It takes some training of your mind to notice internal and external shifts before they turn into a crisis.Exercise I - Observation to details Sit down with a piece of paper and a pen in a familiar space to you (your bedroom, living room). Begin to write down all the items you remember, without looking around.   Once your list is complete - look around and compare your list to what is actually in the room. Notice how many items are missing from your list. Repeat the exercise again immediately.     4a. You can repeat this exercise as many times as you choose over the next few days.Check if more items have been added that were not on the first list?Want to take this exercise one step farther, ask yourself if the item you are missing on the list has value for you at this time or can you give it away, sell it or just through it out. Exercise II - Observation of a physical habitExplore taking an ingrained physical habit such as teeth brushing.Switch hands for a solid week. Observe the differences: what makes the action easier on the habitual side vs. the other? Notice the subtle differences, how you use your body differently as a whole and more specifically your hand grip, the arms’ and joints’ tension, the rigidity of the shoulders and neck ...Be patient. At first it may bring up resistance and frustration.Can you see why changing a habit is so challenging?Our brain has plasticity, and is continually looking for ways to consolidate and automate process otherwise every action we generate would take forever. This advantage can also be a disadvantage because the same applies to habits and conditioning that may not be in our best interest. This can occur in our decision making, responsibilities and accountability in our relationships, finances, how we carry ourselves and other aspects of our lives that may not be functioning effectively. Using observation tools is a multi purpose tool. In the physical body observation equals learning new ways of doing similar activities, rewiring the brain in new ways that are more attuned, more updated than the way you have been habitually opening.In addition, as you notice a habitual pattern in your daily routine, you can begin to discern and decide if it still serves you, or whether you choose to replace it with a more suitable alternative, disrupting the pattern and allowing a fresh perspective.Going back to the analogy of the theatre, while in the spotlight, everything seems to be moving smoothly, behind stage things may not be running so smoothly. There may be arguing about the next scene or the producer may experience stress about the ticket sales ... By using observation, we can sense what is in fact going on behind the scene and address the challenges that arise. This allows the show not only to go on but to thrive.I'd love to hear about what you found out through these exercises. Did you find missing items in the room? Did you manage to brush your teeth with the other hand? If you have found the two exercises beneficial I invite you to continue to the transformational process with me. If you'd like feedback, Schedule a free call to discuss how you responded to the exercises and how you could benefit from working together. Simply send me an email and lets discuss the transformation you just started.

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Listening to Your Body - Observation

Observational toolsIn the quest for balance and flow, it is easily for one to overlook the state ...

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Proactive Breath - Listening to Your Body 2

Why proactive breath works.​ In my previous newsletter I invited you to scan your body and observe your center of gravity, your breath and your shoulders. Today's tool invites you to explore your breath and how it impacts on your daily experience.Do you ever find yourself holding your breath?Growing up I frequently felt anxious and ungrounded. My breath was restricted, resulting in fatigue, muscular tension, lack of attention, often in a state of heightened alert and rarely present. This went on for decades. In fact I was under the impression this was normal!After being introduced to conscious breath, I began to explore what  it was all about. One of the functions our breath serves is to inform the nervous system of our experience: am I safe or in danger? Do I respond or react? As a tool, breath invites us to self connect, check in. It is like an interior massage, that brings awareness to any tension and rigidity stored in the body.Through exercising conscious breathing, at first it felt mechanical, but gradually I began to sense shifts. My habitual state of panic and disconnect was turning into ownership, a new solidity and a willingness to stay present. My breathing patterns were changing too. By directing my attention and focusing on the breath, I was able to slow down and deepen my sense of safety as new insights began to emerge. I could at will, calm down and make choices instead of reacting out of the habitual fear and discomfort.BREATH is the invisible connector that ties our conscious and subconscious reality. During our sleep cycle, it becomes deeper and more relaxed. As our day begins, we get stimulated and our breath consumption frequency increases, raising the heart rate and internal activities throughout the body.Given the fast pace of our lives and the constant bombardment of messages and cues from our surroundings, it is important to have tools that help us ground in our experience. Proactive breath practice, vacillates our reactive, hypersensitive state, setting us up so we can slow down and make healthy choices. Proactive breathing exercise: Place one of your hands on your belly. Inhale through the nose filling your abdomen like a balloon (notice your hand moving forward) Exhale the breath with an open mouth (wide like a lion), use a mirror and pay attention to your mouth. Is it wide open or barely open? Send the air across the room. Repeat several times for 30 - 60 seconds daily.Notice: are you filing your chest or your abdomen? Often our breathing pattern is reversed - we fill our chest first and IF we have any breath left we direct it down towards our abdomen. Focus on reversing the order. Place one hand on your chest and the other on your belly. focus your attention on filling the latter first. Don’t get discouraged if it doesn’t happen immediately. It takes time and practice to change a habit.The act of breathing is the basis of contraction and expansion, ebb and flow or holding and releasing. Discover your patterns: Are you more comfortable inhaling or exhaling? Is your breath fluid, continuous or restricted? Can you keep your attention on the breath or do you get distracted by your thoughts?       Practical application: When experiencing tension, anxiety, pain or simply out of control, take a proactive breath and restore your balance - no medication, no free fall into suppression. This is just the beginning.I'd love to hear about what you found out through this exercise. If you'd like feedback, we can schedule a free call to discuss how your body responds to this exercise and how working together could benefit you. Simply reply to this email and lets continue the transformation you just started by simply checking in.

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Proactive Breath - Listening to Your Body 2

Why proactive breath works.​ In my previous newsletter I invited you to scan your body and observ...

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